blog

By
Anjney Midha
June 20, 2018

Raven Jiang: Engineering at Ubiquity6

This is part of a series of blog posts featuring some of the amazing talent we have working on the technology behind Ubiquity6.

This week, we’re excited to be featuring Raven Jiang. Raven is a technical team lead at Ubiquity6 where he works on the engineering architecture for our front end product.

What were you doing before Ubiquity6?

I grew up in Singapore and went to Stanford for college which is where I met Anjney. I was always a fan of working on big problems and pushing the boundaries of innovation through new technology. I’ve been interested in AR and VR for years, and had previously built many prototypes for AR gameplay for VR controls before motion controllers were released for HTC Vive or Oculus while I was at Stanford. Before Ubiquity6, I worked on consumer products at Facebook and at Tesla where I worked on auto-pilot and building VR experiences with the 8 camera feed of the car.

Why did you choose to join Ubiquity6?

I chose to join Ubiquity6 because I felt that this was the most exciting problem I could be working on today. I grew up reading science fiction and being a part of that sub culture has given me a lot of cool ideas for persistent, global, AR experiences. I also felt like that this was the right time to start a company like this. Being very ingrained in the AR space, I felt the technological progress we’ve been making in the domain was on track for someone to come in and build something to deliver on the Ubiquity6 vision. I joined Ubiquity6 because it is one of the most ambitious engineering challenges that combines my interests and experiences in both AR and web.

Can you tell us about a project you worked on?

I was recently working on a web based 3D visualization tool for us to be able to look at the 3D point clouds that we create during the mapping process. This is helpful in improving our mapping and computer vision systems which is critical to the Ubiquity6 experience. We built the visualization tool on a combination of React and 3.js and it utilizes the most current and modern web technology stack. There were a lot of interesting challenges in terms of building an extensible 3D rendering application on top of a web graphics library and React and I felt that there are very few products and tools out there that combine these technologies in the way that we do here at Ubiquity6. We see a lot of potential in taking the approaches and lessons we have learned from working with these frameworks and applying that to radically transform the consumer experience for AR.

What is your proudest moment at Ubiquity6 so far?

One of the most exciting moments was probably when we managed to get a unified experience that works on both web and mobile while supporting AR and non AR 3D renderings. We are doing a lot of things that are completely new and there aren’t clear solutions you can find so you really have to take in the expertise of people on the team and put them together in a new way to solve those problems. After spending countless hours trying to figure out a lot of the core, hard problems, there was a point where we realized that a lot of what we were setting up to do was actually possible and we just needed to do it.

What are 3 words to describe Ubiquity6?

Fast-paced, challenging, and fun!

What advice do you have for people looking to join the team?

I think that the most important thing is to be open minded and genuinely excited about the challenges at hand. We’re at an interesting intersection where a lot of people are working on foundational problems in AR but its still new enough that you need to be able to be okay with that ambiguity and be creative in your problem solving. Ubiquity6 is more interdisciplinary than a normal consumer app because of the scope of our vision so you need to be ready to tackle things head on.


By
Anjney Midha
June 20, 2018

Raven Jiang: Engineering at Ubiquity6

It’s been a wild three months.

From graffiti filled streets in Spain to underground bunkers in Sausalito, subway stations in Tokyo to industrial kitchens in Texas, the Display.land community has been blowing our minds every morning by capturing, sharing and exploring each others’ spaces from around the world during our early access period.


To learn more about our story of getting to here and where we’re going, keep reading, but if you just want to try it out yourself, head on over to the iOS or Android stores to download and start creating!

What You Can do Today

Capture any space with the device you already own — from as small as a courtyard to entire city blocks
Edit insanely fast — changes you make to your spaces are rendered and saved in real time.
Instantly share your spaces via web links and videos, or freely export them as 3D models
Explore the world and join a community of global explorers in 50 countries

How We Got Here

We started U6 with the mission to unlock new ways for people to create and connect in the physical spaces they care about, such as our PlaySFMOMA space last year.
To create that experience, we captured the SF MOMA’s physical space in 3D using a commodity smartphone, edited and authored it remotely in a web browser, and allowed hundreds of people to browse and experience the sandbox together in real time from their own devices onsite in AR, and remotely via desktop and webVR browsers.

With today’s release, we’re beginning to put those same tools in everybody’s hands, with the goal of building and improving our roadmap in public with our community.

Where We’re Going: Editing Reality Together

Unlocking a new digital canvas for creativity and shared experiences.
Our goal is to grow Display.land into a destination where people can create, share and explore together in new, immersive and interactive ways.

We believe the best way to achieve this is by releasing often and publicly, supporting our earliest creators, and constantly increasing access to creative tools only previously available to high end gaming, graphics and 3D professionals. In the coming months, you can expect to see regular updates along this path.

Display.land is for those of us who see art in reality. If this sounds like something you’re interested in working on, shoot us a note! We’re working on some of the hardest challenges in computer vision, graphics and multiplayer networking and are hiring actively.

-Anjney & Ankit
Co-founders, Ubiquity6

This is part of a series of blog posts featuring some of the amazing talent we have working on the technology behind Ubiquity6.

This week, we’re excited to be featuring Raven Jiang. Raven is a technical team lead at Ubiquity6 where he works on the engineering architecture for our front end product.

What were you doing before Ubiquity6?

I grew up in Singapore and went to Stanford for college which is where I met Anjney. I was always a fan of working on big problems and pushing the boundaries of innovation through new technology. I’ve been interested in AR and VR for years, and had previously built many prototypes for AR gameplay for VR controls before motion controllers were released for HTC Vive or Oculus while I was at Stanford. Before Ubiquity6, I worked on consumer products at Facebook and at Tesla where I worked on auto-pilot and building VR experiences with the 8 camera feed of the car.

Why did you choose to join Ubiquity6?

I chose to join Ubiquity6 because I felt that this was the most exciting problem I could be working on today. I grew up reading science fiction and being a part of that sub culture has given me a lot of cool ideas for persistent, global, AR experiences. I also felt like that this was the right time to start a company like this. Being very ingrained in the AR space, I felt the technological progress we’ve been making in the domain was on track for someone to come in and build something to deliver on the Ubiquity6 vision. I joined Ubiquity6 because it is one of the most ambitious engineering challenges that combines my interests and experiences in both AR and web.

Can you tell us about a project you worked on?

I was recently working on a web based 3D visualization tool for us to be able to look at the 3D point clouds that we create during the mapping process. This is helpful in improving our mapping and computer vision systems which is critical to the Ubiquity6 experience. We built the visualization tool on a combination of React and 3.js and it utilizes the most current and modern web technology stack. There were a lot of interesting challenges in terms of building an extensible 3D rendering application on top of a web graphics library and React and I felt that there are very few products and tools out there that combine these technologies in the way that we do here at Ubiquity6. We see a lot of potential in taking the approaches and lessons we have learned from working with these frameworks and applying that to radically transform the consumer experience for AR.

What is your proudest moment at Ubiquity6 so far?

One of the most exciting moments was probably when we managed to get a unified experience that works on both web and mobile while supporting AR and non AR 3D renderings. We are doing a lot of things that are completely new and there aren’t clear solutions you can find so you really have to take in the expertise of people on the team and put them together in a new way to solve those problems. After spending countless hours trying to figure out a lot of the core, hard problems, there was a point where we realized that a lot of what we were setting up to do was actually possible and we just needed to do it.

What are 3 words to describe Ubiquity6?

Fast-paced, challenging, and fun!

What advice do you have for people looking to join the team?

I think that the most important thing is to be open minded and genuinely excited about the challenges at hand. We’re at an interesting intersection where a lot of people are working on foundational problems in AR but its still new enough that you need to be able to be okay with that ambiguity and be creative in your problem solving. Ubiquity6 is more interdisciplinary than a normal consumer app because of the scope of our vision so you need to be ready to tackle things head on.


By
Anjney Midha
June 20, 2018

Raven Jiang: Engineering at Ubiquity6

Creators! Did you know that you can download any of your captures as a 3D model? 

We currently support OBJ, GLTF, and PLY file formats, which make it possible to use captures from Display.land in Blender, Cinema4D, Unity, Unreal, Maya, and most other popular creative software applications.

To download the 3D mesh, just open one of your captures in a desktop web browser, and click the download button in the upper-right corner of the screen. You’ll need to be logged in to see it.

If you are on iOS, the easiest way to open your capture in a browser is through AirDrop. You can AirDrop yourself the link to the desired capture by opening the Share Menu and pressing “More.” From there, a new menu will open giving you the option to airdrop the link. 

If you are on Android, we find it is easiest to email yourself the link. Open the Share Menu and press “More.” From there, choose email or whatever the best option is for you.
Once your 3D mesh has downloaded, this is where the magic begins. You now have the opportunity to create phenomenal artwork using captured physical reality. Try challenging the mundane by drawing in the absurd.

Or, experiment with contrasting elements. The opportunities are endless and the boundaries are limitless. Check out what our creators have made with Display.land below.
We absolutely love to see what our Creators create using their Display.land meshes. In fact, we have an entire Discord channel dedicated to them! You can find this channel here: https://discord.gg/b2vxQpu.
We can’t wait for you to join and to see how Display.land has inspired you. ✨